Bio

John McKee BarrI am a professor of history at Lone Star College–Kingwood. I joined their faculty in 2008. This is my personal blog and in no way represents the views of Lone Star College. I can be reached at johnmckeebarr@gmail.com.

Previous to my appointment at Lone Star, I taught history in middle school for six years and was a high school AP U.S. history teacher for eighteen years at Kingwood High School in north Houston, Texas. I received my Ph.D. from the University of Houston in 2010 under the supervision of Eric Walther, author of The Fire-Eaters and William Lowndes Yancey and the Coming of the Civil War.

I teach a variety of courses at Lone Star – Kingwood, including the survey of U.S. History. I also teach courses entitled “Political Novels” (an idea of Larry Arnhart’s), “The Emancipators: Charles Darwin, Abraham Lincoln, and the Making of the Modern World,” and “Revolution and Counterrevolution.”

In addition to this book, I have published a chapter on African-American Memory and Lincoln in Lincoln’s Enduring Legacy and the Lincoln Herald (with David Silkenat), and an excerpt from Loathing Lincoln will appear in the forthcoming issue of the Journal of the Abraham Lincoln Association.

Loathing Lincoln is my first book.

 

 
 

One thought on “Bio

  1. I very much enjoyed your blog, Loathing Lincoln. I am working on a history book-blog of my own, which can be seen at [one word] theoryofirony.com, then clicking on either the “sample chapter” or “blog” buttons at the top. My Rube Goldberg brain asks with an odd, well-caffeinated kind of logic: Why is there an inverse proportion between the size of the print and the importance of the message? Politics. Religion. Science. Commerce. Art. Literature. Military. I call this eccentric thinking the Theory of Irony and if your busy schedule permits, give a read, leave a comment or create a blogroll link. In any event, best of luck with your own endeavor.

    P.S. It seems ironic that the most prominent passage, from the most famous speech in history starts, “The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here…”.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *